3 Main Schools of Qìgōng.

Qìgōng Basics… simple understandings.
3 Main Schools of Qìgōng.
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22
May

 

In this article…

The 3 main schools of Qìgōng.

Intuitive definitions.

*Please note TCM = Traditional Chinese Medicine

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The 3 main schools of Qìgōng are:  Martial, Medical & Spiritual.

These three Qìgōng disciplines share the same philosophical base and many of the same meditations & techniques.

However, they differ in their focus.


Sānbǎo = The Three Treasures (or Three Jewels)

Jing Qi Shen - maria furlano

Jīng, Qì, Shén


Martial Qìgōng (also known as Sports Qìgōng)

Martial Qìgōng practitioners focuses on training for power, flexibility, strength, balance, coordination and conditioning of their bodies to prevent injuries.

Martial Qìgōng techniques are used specifically to bring energy into muscles, tendons and bones to use in fighting application. 

Qìgōng practice can be valuable in sports training, as any focus on increasing stamina, coordination, speed, flexibility; as well as restorative Qìgōng techniques to replenish an athlete is optimal.

Advanced student's of martial schools also train in the skills of Neì Gōng (internal skill), Qì Gōng (energy skill) and Shén Gōng (spirit skill) to fight against their opponent.


Medical Qìgōng Exercises

The goal of Medical Qìgōng exercises is to increase circulation of blood, qi, and lymph throughout the body. Specific Qìgōng exercises are prescribed to purge (release), tonify (strengthen), and regulate (balance) the meridian, organ, lymphatic, circulatory and nervous systems of the body; as well as manage stress and release deep-seated emotions for sustained healing.

Qìgōng  exercises include dynamic and quiescent exercises, including specific breathing techniques, postural alignment and focused intention; that are prescribed in accordance of the TCM differential diagnosis.

Medical Qìgōng Therapy

Medical Qìgōng therapy is the eldest therapy modality of Chinese Medicine. Treatment is based on the diagnose and treatment principles of Traditional Chinese Medicine. 

As the patient lays on a table or sits in a chair, the Medical Qìgōng doctor treats with external qì emission, using the methods of purgation, tonification and regulation of energy to treat the diagnosed imbalances.

"Long distance sessions":  A cultivated practitioner has the ability to perceive imbalances (also known as "medical intuitive") and treat with medicial qìgōng therapy from a distance.

Medical Qìgōng Therapy Includes 5 Major Clinical Modalities:

1. Distance qì emission.

2. Self regulation prescriptions.

3. Qì Gōng massage – soft tissue regulation techniques.

4. Sound healing therapy.

5. Invisible needle technique.

 

Intuitive development

The developed Medical Qìgōng doctor or practitioner has the ability to their use intuitive senses to get to the root of physical, emotional and spiritual imbalances causing dis-ease. These intuitive skills are used face-to-face, or when working from a distance.

Listed below are the most common skills used to intuitively read the energy of a person, place or object. The word "clair" comes from the french word meaning "clear.".

Clairalience:  "Clear smelling" (also called clairscent) – To acquire knowledge without actually smelling a tangible object.

Clairaudience:  "Clear hearing" – Perceiving, as if by hearing, what is inaudible.

Claircognizance:  "Clear knowing" – To acquire psychic knowledge without knowing how or why he or she knew it.

Clairgustance:  "Clear tasting" – To taste a substance without putting anything in one's mouth.

Clairsentience:  "Clear feeling" (this includes clairempathy) – To acquire psychic knowledge by means of feeling.

Clairtangency:  "Clear touching" Commonly known as psychometry. To handle or touch an object and receive information.

Clairvoyance:  "Clear seeing" –  Perceiving things or events in the future or beyond normal sensory contact.


Spiritual Qìgōng

The spiritual philosophy of Qigong has come from Taoism and Buddhism.

Spiritual Qigong focuses on spiritual cultivation; focusing on the purest depth of conscious awareness and alignment.


References

Johnson, Jerry Alan. Chinese Medical Qigong Therapy Volume 1:  Energetic Anatomy and Physiology. California:  The International Institute of Medical Qigong, 2002.

Johnson, Jerry Alan. Chinese Medical Qigong Therapy Volume 2:  Energetic Alchemy, Dao Yin Therapy and Qi Deviations. California:  The International Institute of Medical Qigong, 2002.

Johnson, Jerry Alan. Chinese Medical Qigong Therapy Volume 3:  Differential Diagnosis, Clinical Foundations, Treatment Principles and Clinical Protocols. California:  The International Institute of Medical Qigong, 2002.

Johnson, Jerry Alan. Chinese Medical Qigong Therapy Volume 4:  Prescription Exercises and Meditations, Treatment of Internal Diseases, Pediatrics, Geriatrics, Gynecology, Neurology and Energetic Psychology. California:  The International Institute of Medical Qigong, 2002.

Johnson, Jerry Alan. Chinese Medical Qigong Therapy Volume 5:  An Energetic Approach to Oncology. California:  The International Institute of Medical Qigong, 2002.

Johnson, Jerry Alan. The Essence of Internal Martial Arts Vol. 2. California: The Ching Lien Healing Arts Center, 1994

Shannon, Bernard. International College of Medical Qigong. "Types of Qigong." Sept. 8, 2012. May 18, 2014. http://www.medicalqigong.org.


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